States That Expand Medicaid Seeing Millions In Savings

March 23, 2016

In Part, They’re Spending Less on Programs for the Uninsured

Dr. John Lumpkin, Senior Vice President at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

(Washington, DC, Wednesday, March 23, 2016)  – A new study from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shows that states that expanded their Medicaid program are seeing millions of dollars in savings and new revenues. In part, they’re spending less on programs for the uninsured. Under the Affordable Care Act, if states expand eligibility, the federal government covers the cost of Medicaid for people with incomes up to $33,500 for a family of four.

Dr. John Lumpkin, senior vice president at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, says states that expanded Medicaid are reaping the financial benefits, while neighboring states that didn’t are being left behind.

SOUNDBITE #1:

STATES ARE FACING A CHOICE. THEY CAN STICK WITH THE STATUS QUO, OR THEY CAN EXPAND WHO’S ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID AND ULTIMATELY SAVE MONEY. THE EVIDENCE IS CLEAR. STATES THAT EXPAND THE MEDICAID PROGRAM ARE SAVING MILLIONS OF DOLLARS, WHILE PROVIDING HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE TO PREVIOUSLY UNINSURED RESIDENTS.

SOUNDBITE #2:

THE DECISION TO EXPAND MEDICAID HAS BEEN A FINANCIAL WIN FOR STATES DOING SO. THESE STATES ARE SEEING MILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN BUDGET SAVINGS, WHILE MORE RESIDENTS HAVE INSURANCE AND BETTER ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE.

For more information, visit RWJF.org.

 

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